Conversations with the Living: The Haitian AIDS Crisis

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Archive for the ‘World AIDS Day’ Category

World AIDS Day and Conversations With the Living

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WORLD AIDS DAY 2011

Today is World AIDS Day. Since 1988 World AIDS Day has been held on December 1st and provides the opportunity for people around the world to unite in the fight against HIV, offer support to those affected and infected with HIV, and honor the lives of those who have died as a result of the virus.

World AIDS Day is one day, every year, dedicated to raising money, fighting prejudice, increasing awareness, improving education and helping people understand the facts surrounding HIV/AIDS globally. World AIDS Day is a way to remind people that AIDS is still a serious issue affecting millions of people each year. Although numerous organizations and activists work everyday to address the issue of HIV/AIDS, the global community needs to remember the importance of raising awareness of HIV year round. The global crisis goes relatively unnoticed in the mainstream media, and oftentimes, unless directly affected, people tend to know very little about HIV/AIDS in their own communities, cities, and countries. World AIDS day is an opportunity to learn facts about HIV and use that knowledge to help in your community.

Even as scientific advances are made in HIV treatment, many people still go without access to resources and struggle with properly educating people about the virus, which plays a large role in reducing infection rates and fighting the discrimination and stigma often attached to the virus.

There are currently 33 million people living with HIV. This year 1.8 million HIV-positive persons died of Aids-related-illnesses and as many as 2.7 million were infected, that is over seven thousand people a day. HIV is a threat to men, women and children on all continents around the world.

GETTING TO ZERO

This year’s World AIDS Day theme is Getting to Zero, which focuses on three targets, Zero new HIV infections, Zero discrimination, and Zero AIDS-related deaths. This is the goal of all goals. This is a call to arms, the very point of the global fight against HIV. There is a long way to go, but by focusing on reducing infection, stigma and deaths, given the progress made within populations with access to live saving medications and nutrition, this is a goal that cultivates great hope and aims to prove what can be accomplished with compassion and cooperation efforts.

Conversations With the Living is a documentary film that focuses on this hope and the amazing progress made when there is access to resources.

CONVERSATIONS WITH THE LIVING & HIV

Conversations With the Living is a feature length documentary that focuses on HIV-positive orphans and the daily lives of these children. In the process, the film highlights the network dedicated to bringing HIV-positive orphans the medication, food, housing, education, and emotional support that keeps them alive. We will trace the path of that medication from the child through the entire network that made it possible, showing the dedicated individuals that work tirelessly every day, grinding through routine and unforeseen challenges and providing real solutions to Haiti’s battle against HIV. It takes effort, organization, continued funding, and unerring dedication on the part of countless people to give these children a chance for survival and a future where they can be engaged and accepted in their communities.

As government agencies and aid organizations tighten their belts due to the struggling economy; HIV, and the core issues that make it difficult to combat, like poverty, malnourishment, and lack of access to medication, are tightening their grip on the most vulnerable populations. But, there are people doing incredible work, providing both access and support to those affected by and infected with HIV in Haiti, and we are telling their story.

The ultimate goal of Conversations with the Living is to draw attention to HIV/AIDS in the developing world and continue to raise awareness of the need to support AIDS organizations around the world. We are determined to show that HIV progress does not happen by accident and that the network of caregivers and activists that work together to provide for these children is intricate and delicate.

This network provides real hope for the future of these children and represents what is positive and possible. The positive strides made against the disease in countries like Haiti and the people who make it possible must not only be recognized, but also supported. Raising and maintaining awareness about the efforts of dedicated HIV workers must happen and their work must be expanded upon.

HIV & HAITI

In Haiti, an estimated 40,000 people die of AIDS every year. These are grim numbers when considering the size of the country, which is roughly the size of Maryland. When taking into account that a large percentage of at-risk Haitians who do not get tested due to access and fear of social stigma, experts believe the national statistic is much higher than recorded; some believe as high as 11%.Currently one in twenty Haitians is infected with HIV/AIDS and there are over 150,000 AIDS orphan.

No one should ever die of a treatable disease. Haiti’s struggle with AIDS and the elements of history that have contributed to its prevalence, still exist and continue to exacerbate the issue. The failure to provide access and address the societal issues surrounding HIV in Haiti only maintains and perpetuates a system that produces more death, deprivation, and disease.

For people living in developed countries around the world, HIV has become a manageable disease, however the majority of the world’s people living in the developing world are not afforded that luxury. Their children are the next generation of survivors, advocates and activists, and they are proof positive of what is possible given the resources and support.

When the HIV-positive are provided the proper resources in Haiti, they are happy, healthy and hopeful. Lives are being saved and people need to know what is working in Haiti and what needs to be done to maintain this work and broaden its reach. 

There is a vital need to raise money, increase awareness, fight prejudice and improve education and your participation is needed, not just today, but everyday.

– Leigh E. Carlson

CONVERSATIONS WITH KAY ANGEL

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Conversations With the Living recently made contact with Lia Van de Donk, the director of Kay Angel orphanage in Jacmel, Haiti, which provides a home, education and support for children in need and those infected or affected by HIV/AIDS.

After a very positive conversation with Lia regarding her work at Kay Angel and the mission and purpose of our film, it was clear that Kay Angel’s everyday work to provide HIV-positive and orphaned children in need, access to life saving medication, housing, education and support aligned with the mission of Conversations With the Living and the message of our film.

We have been in contact with Lia since our first discussion in order to stay updated on the progress at Kay Angel, as well as to coordinate a visit upon our return to Haiti, in order to document the incredible work being done to improve the lives of these children.

We are inspired by the work of Kay Angel and their willingness to take on the challenge of caring for this often forgotten demographic, and the Conversations With the Living team wants to introduce those who support this project and the work being done to help children affected by and infected with HIV/AIDS to Kay Angel.

The Story of Kay Angel

Kay Angel, Creole for Angel House, opened its doors in 2007 and is currently home to 12 children; 5 are HIV+ and all are lucky to be alive.

Their first home was rented for one year in Jacmel before they moved to St. Helene, another neighborhood in Jacmel. In St. Helene the children of school age attended either the local kindergarten, a school for the handicapped or were taught by a private teacher at the orphanage. When the January 12th earthquake destroyed the children’s schools and the orphanage, Lia and the children lived in the streets for about 2 weeks, and then in tents for 15 months.  On April 1st of this year Kay Angel was able to rent a temporary home in Zorange for 1 year, while construction of their permanent home is being completed.

Today, they are in the process of building their permanent home on a piece of land named Sacrifice, which they were able to buy this past year with money raised through individual donations from family and friends and outreach on their two dedicated blogs in the United States and Holland, Lia’s native country.

We emphasize home, because Lia, who lives with the children along with her husband, makes sure that the daily needs of the children are met and that a family environment is provided, where the children are loved, accepted and supported. Along with a small local staff, they make sure that the children are fed, attend school and that their medications are measured and administered twice a day.

The children that are HIV-positive are in the Aids program of USAID at the local hospital St. Michel, which is a free program that includes a monthly examination by the doctor, Dr Raphael, and a monthly supply of ARV meds. When asked about how their home manages to function and provide resources year round, Lia shared that aside from individual donations, organizations like USAID have been instrumental in providing the children’s health care needs. Without this program and the free medical supplies that it donates, it would be extremely difficult to care for the children that are HIV+, due to the tremendous expense of ARV medication. Additionally, Kay Angel has its own paid Haitian pediatrician on staff that visits Kay Angel once a month to consult the children, and subscribe additional medication or vitamin and protein supplements as needed, which are paid for by Kay Angel.

Some help in the form of rice, cooking oil and beans comes monthly from the World Food Programme (WFP), and any additional nutritional needs are met through purchases from local markets and vendors.

After a long struggle to find adequate schools for the children, especially those that are HIV-positive, Lia was able to enroll the children in SOS Enfants in Cyvadier, with the exception of one child who attends PAZAPA, a school for handicapped and special needs children located in town. The children have adjusted extraordinarily well to the school environment and have received good marks. The children’s performance in school has been a great accomplishment and source of excitement, due to the fact that prior to coming to Kay Angel, the children had not been afforded the opportunity to attend school.

The majority of education in Haiti is privatized, therefore families or organizations supporting children, must pay to send their children to school. With 80% of the population living under the poverty line and 54% in abject poverty, providing children with an education often means the family goes without other basic necessities or the children are simply not educated.

The children living at Kay Angel are the fortunate. The children wake up everyday in a loving environment, where their mental and physical well-being are the priority, and the benefits of this environment provide an example of what is possible if people focus on the needs in the communities they serve and advocate for substantial change and real solutions.

There were an estimated 380,000 orphans before the earthquake, as many as 225,000 children living as retaveks (child slaves), and approximately 150,000 orphaned by HIV/AIDS.

Kay Angel works with these children, not only because there is a need, but also because they have seen through their own work that children provided the proper resources and support can live happy and healthy lives. The children they care for are proof-positive of what is possible given compassion and cooperation efforts, and they are an example of what is working in Haiti.

Both Kay Angel and Conversations With the Living are focused on HIV-positive orphans and the importance of recognizing the effort, organization, continued funding, and unerring dedication required to give these children a chance for survival and a future where they can be engaged and accepted in their communities. Kay Angel is a place where the methods used on the ground in Haiti and within the Haitian community shed light on the small, yet existing network of people dedicated to creating a better life and future for Haiti and her children.

While, we prepare to return to Haiti, Lia and her staff work daily, around the clock, juggling time taking care of the children’s needs and the construction of the new orphanage. We look forward to sharing their continued progress with you and to introducing you to some of the amazing children at Kay Angel.

– Leigh E. Carlson

CWTL Production Diary: Getting Moving Again with the LA AIDS Walk and then some…

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Monday July, 18th – 7:30PM:

Hello from Los Angeles, where the Conversations With the Living team has registered  for the LA AIDS WALK, which is happening on October 16th, 2011. Members of our team have walked for the past several years as individuals, but this year we are walking as a team, joining grassroots fundraisers and community activists who raise millions of dollars for organizations working to make a difference in the lives of people affected by HIV/AIDS.

AIDS WALK LOS ANGELES  has raised $66 million for HIV programs and services in Los Angeles County since 1985 and unites people of all ages, races, and backgrounds.

These individuals and organizations are pulling together in an organized effort to provide urgently needed funds that will go to provide critical resources to those affected by HIV, including food, medication, housing, emotional support and to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS in their community and across the globe.

We will be getting our group site up to speed and ready to share with you so you can track our progress as we work to reach our fundraising goal.

I will post the information once our group page is set-up and hope you will visit the site to learn a little more about what the LA community is doing to fight HIV/AIDS. As you know it is not just about October 16th, 2011 in LA or December 1st on WORLD AIDS DAY;  events like these all over the world bring people together, garner support from the community and yield impressive results – proof positive that when a focused effort is made and the critical need to fund HIV/AIDS initiatives is present in dialogue about community and global health there can be amazing outcomes. Once or twice a year is not enough, but it is an amazing opportnity to become involved and have your voice heard. Many of those involved in these very important events have made the fight against HIV/AIDS their life’s work. Conversations With the Living is looking forward to supporting these organziations in their work and hopes that our project will help shed light on the significance of their efforts and the positive results of their dedication.

As Conversations With the Living continues to move forward and works to complete its film focused on HIV/AIDS in Haiti, a project over two years in the making, we understand the importance of being involved in the global fight against HIV, and remain inspired by the support in communities like LA and NYC for a disease that prior to community support carried with it a crippling uncertainty. My hope is that the same level of  engagement and acceptance for those suffering from HIV/AIDS will be found in developing countries like Haiti. This is one of the many things that we are working for.

Will post our video from the LA AIDS Walk from the last two years shortly.

– LC

Increasing Threat of HIV in Haiti

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Wednesday, December 1st was World AIDS Day. Tomorrow is Wednesday, December 8th. Based on current figures, within the past week an estimated 35,000 people have died of AIDS-related-illnesses globally.

World AIDS Day is one day, every year, dedicated to raising money, fighting prejudice, increasing awareness, improving education and helping people understand the facts surrounding HIV/AIDS globally. World AIDS Day is a way to remind people that AIDS is still a serious issue affecting millions of people each year. Although numerous organizations and activists work everyday to address the issue of HIV/AIDS, the global crisis goes relatively unnoticed in the mainstream media. Oftentimes, unless directly affected, people tend to know very little about HIV/AIDS in their own communities, cities, and countries.

Throughout the world as many as 2.6 million people will become infected with HIV within the next year, that is over seven thousand people a day. There are currently 33 million people living with HIV. Last year 1.8 million HIV-positive persons died of Aids-related-illnesses. HIV is a threat to men, women and children on all continents around the world.

This year’s World AIDS Day theme is Universal Access and Human Rights, a theme explored in the documentary film Conversations With the Living: Globalization and the Haitian AIDS Crisis, which explores the current HIV/AIDS crisis in Haiti and the history of the disease there. Prior to January’s earthquake organizations like Partner’s In Health (PIH), GHESKIO and UNAIDS were making positive strides and seeing progress amongst the affected population. Now, nearly a year later, some aid organizations have redirected funds to other important initiatives, and HIV, although there is certain risk of increased infections, has received very little attention. With the recent media attention paid to the cholera outbreak and the elections, it is important to also focus on the growing concern of health care workers and patients that the constant state of crisis in Haiti is sure to lead to an increase in HIV infections and deaths if prevention and treatment do not become a focus in Haiti’s recovery.

With access to proper medication, progress has been made. That’s the challenge; making progress in all regions affected and maintaining that progress has proven difficult when conditions are deplorable and a mere portion of people in desperate need of medication have access to antiretroviral treatment.

AIDS in Haiti is as destructive as any natural disaster and has infected as many as 5 million people, and killed over 1 million people in Haiti since the 1990s.

Prior to the earthquake:

• 40% of the Haitian population did not have access to primary health care.
• Haiti was ranked 146th out of 177 countries according to the United Nations Development
Programme Human Development Index with 76% of Haitian’s living on US$2 per day and 56% on
less that US$1 per day, significantly below the poverty line.
• 46% of the entire population was malnourished, a figure the Global Hunger Index notes as
“Alarming”, and this percentage has only increased since the deadly earthquake.
• The United Nations estimates 2% of Haitians are infected with HIV/AIDS, the highest rate in the
Western Hemisphere.

An estimated 40,000 people die of AIDS in Haiti every year; grim numbers when considering the size of the country, which is roughly the size of New York City. When taking into account that a large percentage of at-risk Haitians who do not get tested due to access and fear of social stigma, experts believe the national statistic is much higher than recorded; some believe as high as 11%.

No one should ever die of a treatable disease. Haiti’s struggles with AIDS and the elements of history that have contributed to its prevalence still exist and continue to exacerbate the issue. The failure to provide access and address the societal issues surrounding HIV in Haiti only maintains and perpetuates a system that produces more death, deprivation, and disease.

– LC

World AIDS Day 2010 Message

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Today is World AIDS Day and while it is nice to see so many people tweeting and facebooking so enthusiastically, it must be said – posting messages online once, even twice, a year just does not cut it. Though I hate to say it, the need for a specially designated day for people to champion a worthy cause just does not cut it and is indicative to the prevalent and crippling apathy that plagues the world these days. That isn’t to say that everyone needs to join an organization in order to help because there are infinite ways to make a difference. If you like to write, blog about HIV/AIDS or volunteer some time to press releases for a grass roots organization. If you are the greatest cook on your block, maybe you can volunteer some food for an upcoming HIV/AIDS related event. If you feel you have no talents, donations to charitable organization – no matter how humble the amount – are always welcome. Seriously. The one thing that is certain is that one day of exuberant tweeting does not make up for three-hundred sixty-four days of inactivity. To quote John Lennon as he addressed the crowd at a fundraiser for John Sinclair, “Apathy isn’t it.”

It really isn’t.

Get involved.

Written by conversationswiththeliving

December 1, 2010 at 2:05 pm